Games Workshop: Increased Prices, Complaints, Problems and Paints!

Games Workshop’s increased prices on both their models and paints are causing modelers and retailers to be more cautious.

Last year, Games Workshop announced they would increase their prices world-wide. Then in June of 2013 they announced a price increase on their paint pots. Since the initial price increases, independent retailers of Games Workshop and hobbyists are still feeling the pinch.

These just a few of the kits that were subject to change from last year's price increase.

These just a few of the kits that were subject to change from last year’s price increase.                     Chart Was Made By: Morgan Zwart

Warhammer 40k is Games Workshop’s most popular franchise. Adam Ludwig, a regular at Galaxy Comic Games and More in Stevens Point and avid player of Warhammer 40k since 2008, says that Games Workshop’s problems may be because of the current miniature war-game market.

“There are other companies trying to compete against Game Workshop like Privateer Press and other miniature games that are becoming popular, but the price has gone up almost double from when I started playing. I think it is really hard for new players to get into the game and I  think  its hard for anyone who is not in the middle class or above to really start playing the game and keep up with the game.” said Ludwig.

He also said that this is especially true when the company constantly changes the rules, rule books and codices, that It becomes a lot harder  for anyone to keep up with the game financially. As a player of the hobby, Ludwig says that the current price increases has affected his relationship with Games Workshop.

“It certainly has made me stop buying all of my minis through Games workshop. I actually  started looking at alternatives.  I don’t buy nearly as much of the base product from Games Workshop like I normally do,” said Ludwig.

Over the past five years, Games Workshop has been slowly increasing their prices. Now with the current price increase on their paint sets, it has some cause for concern when carrying any Games Workshop miniatures and paints.

 Chris Randazzo, owner Galaxy Comic Games and More in Stevens Point, says that the sudden price increase on the paints in June of 2013 was a nightmare for him. On the same day of the price increase he  quickly had to change every one of the paints in his system to get the prices up to date.

“I will not have anything bad to say about it in a general sense and it is not even a retailer trying to protect a distributor like Games Workshop, it is not even about that. To me Games Workshop is a very frustrating company to deal with at times.” says Randazzo.

Randazzo also says that Games Workshop’s main rules for their games change drastically at times and will often change how your armies will play in their games.
This makes players need to buy new products from Games Workshop for all intents and purposes, even though officially Games Workshop says that you can use their miniatures.

“I will tell you that, before you ever buy a product from me, before you ever buy a Games Workshop product. Please don’t think that you are going to buy one army and play that army forever and it is your $200 investment and then you are done buying.” said Randazzo

Although this these models may not look like much, they collectively cost $90, plus tax.

These models may not look like much, but because of the new price listings, they collectively cost $90 plus tax.

Randazzo says that as a player of the Games Workshop franchises, you are going to have to buy new stuff, new editions and rules books are coming out and you are going to want to buy new stuff. He then stated that if people were still playing 2nd edition with our old army books players would be bored with the game.

As a realtor though, Randazzo has said that the current price change doesn’t change the way he feels about Games Workshop. He says that good distributors and good game companies see him as a partner, such as Wizards of the Coast.

“For the last 7 years I have been open, Wizards of the Coast has figured out its business model, and their business model is organized play. It used to be that what good products I could buy was based on how much I spent.” said Randazzo

Randazzo says that he was on a different customer tier and the more money he spent the better products he received. Then Wizards of the Coast figured out that if retailers ran enough events then he and the company were going to sell more products. Everything Wizards of the Coast does for him now is based on the events he runs and the more events he runs, the better the products he gets. Randazzo then stated that this model is not used by Games Workshop, however.

“Games Workshop is not my partner. They have never been my partner. Every couple of years they will change the retailer agreement, like what I have to sign, how I have to order and how I pay shipping. And they always present it as, ‘ we are finally going to see you, oh small retailer, as a partner and that we know that your business is as important as anybody else out there and you are what makes us go’,” said Randazzo.

Before June of 2013, all paint pots officially cost $3.50.

Before June of 2013, all paint pots officially cost $3.50.

Games Workshop changed their retailer policy just before the launch of the new paint line, claiming that the change was because of the new paint line. Randazzo did not know that they would be doubling the SKU’s on the new paint line products, much to the complaints of many retailers at trade shows. Game Workshop is still making it mandatory that retailers need to buy their paints in a package of 6 paint pots.

“They only gave me a paint rack if I bought all the paints and said that I might be able to get the rack later on, but if I didn’t buy all the paints then they couldn’t guarantee me one and continued to package the paint pots in 6. Paints that don’t sell as well die on my self. It’s hard for me to stock their paints when I have to carry six of everything.” said Randazzo.

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Apocalypse Kits: Emperor’s Talons Recon Company

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This a Waste-hounds sentinel unit I painted two years ago. The shorter looking sentinel actually has the pewter parts which made it cost $35.00 about five or six years ago.

Finally Something I Can Get Behind

After seeing the current pricing on the Emperor’s Talons Recon Company, I have to say, ‘why didn’t they do this crap sooner so I didn’t have to spend almost $350.00, plus tax?’ Currently, the price of the Emperor’s Talons Recon Company stands at $300 and what is funny is that you can still buy 10 sentinels and get the same price; if it was not for sales taxes.

Why I Like This Kit

Once I have enough money I am going to buy one of these. I’ve always thought that sentinels have always been an important aspect of the Imperial Guard Army list. They are useful for a hard hitting advances with mechanized infantry, especially if you do not have a tank for support, and if you use them correctly they can be used for flanking tightly held enemy positions. You could say that the armor value alone does not make these for a sensible buy, but I’m an old 3rd edition guard player at heart and I love the idea of fluff based armies.

In My Opinion

To be fairly honest, when the finally turned the whole sentinel kits into all plastic I was rather happy about the change. If you wanted to buy a sentinel you had to buy it in different patterns: Mars, Cadian, Armageddon. Each individual model was priced, to the best of my knowledge, was priced as: Mars, $25; Cadian,$30; Armageddon, $35. If you think that is ridiculous, at the same time these prices were around, an Chimera APC was about the same price as the Armageddon pattern sentinel.

By making everything plastic, it really cut the cost that made the expensive pewter parts the Armageddon pattern had, but because of the kit be change into a more universal sentinel kit at a decent price rate.The one thing I will miss though about the pewter parts though and that is the hardiness. I can drop my old sentinel on the floor and it does not shatter like the newer models.

On that note I would like to say this. I’ve worked in manufacturing, both in metalworking and carpentry and know what quality control is, but I feel as if the quality of the plastic the models once had, is diminishing.

If you are wondering if that is a dead Eldar, then you are correct. I do not like them and they make great model base material.

If you are wondering if that is a dead Eldar, then you are correct. I do not like them, and they make great model base material.

I think that cost cutting on the quality for quantity has made the models cheaper for some of the armies (sorry space marine players), but somewhere along the line quality should be more important when it comes to plastic models.

WIP: Armored Fist Squad 317

This has been a work in progress for the last three months. I was working overtime at a factory over the summer. The only time I had to work on my miniatures was Sunday and I don’t know about you, but if I’m really tired, I just can’t work. I have some time now to show the progress of this squad.

This is the Chimera I am using for the squad.

This is the Chimera I am using for the squad.

The squad is currently being painted, but what’s bad about it is the painting progress. When one of the heads started become caked in paint.

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I cleaned the mold lines off the head and then realized I had mold lines on all the other models. Most of these models are from when I was twelve (which is why paint was caked on) and I now have the graces of cleaning all the models. This is a huge bother, but I’m pretty confident that I won’t have the same problem with the second platoon, I hope.

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However, this has been a very long project and I’m willing to finish it up. This platoon project has been really fun, but I wish painting was as easy as modeling.

Finished: Armored Fist Squad 728

Meanwhile At College
It’s done, it is finally completed. I feel I like I some what accomplished something, but at any rate this squad is done. This squad took me a better part of a week to finish up and that’s including the Chimera APC. Finishing the project, I found out, was rather easy; Since I have (literally) a small book of decals. I finally decided to use them up and the I’m happy with the result. Don’t get me wrong though; hand painted numbers are fine, but I don’t paint numbers all that well.

Marching across the desk-top like they should.

Marching across the desk-top like they should.

The squad is rather basic, but that’s how I prefer my squads. I like to have one flamer per-squad, but sometimes grenade launchers are very handy against light infantry and light armor. Lately, I’ve been putting more stock in flamer-throwers, because I think they are more useful when it comes to the over-watch rule. I still like grenade launchers though, because of the range and they have the same firing capability as a mortar team.

The models seem to be screaming a lot that of late.

In all their black and blue and white all over, polka dot glory.

The APC is another story. Much of the work done behind the APC was rather tedious with me having to go back and paint certain spots after I dropped it and surprisingly not break! Since I still paint with old GW colors, I finally got into the technique of layer, but now the new GW paints do that for you, but at least the layering process isn’t as hard anymore.

A view of the left side.

A view of the left side.

A view of the right side.

A view of the right side.

First, for the whole tank I used codex grey as a base layer, then did dry-brushed layer of fortress grey, then a highlight of fortress grey (watered down).

A view of the turret and gunner.

A view of the turret and gunner.

The weapons were based painted with boltgun metal and then layered with chain-mail, then inked with tin-bitz and black ink. The heavy stubber’s ammo can was layered with codex grey, then layered with camo green and highlighted with a watered down sunburst yellow.

The smile written with micro-pen references a photo from the Iraq war.

The smile written with micro-pen references a photo from the Iraq war.

The optics of the crew members helmet and the view ports were painted by layering, regal blue as the base layer, then enchanted blue, then fortress grey then skull white.

WIP: Chimera 728

Meanwhile At College

I was able to scrap some money together the other day and decided that I would buy another Chimera. I honestly, think it’s a load of crap that they cost almost $40 now. It is nice though that I can get some new bits for the Chimera, but taking away a majority of the accessories makes the kit lacking. A new Chimera will cost about $37.75; when only 3 years ago they only cost $35.00 and had the tank accessories sprue added to the kit. Now if i want the sprue kit, I gotta fork over $15.00 for something that was included. I’m getting charged more, for less. It’s like they are the Federal Reserve and IRS of miniature games.

The Beast of APCs

Tashorn 912th Armoured Regiment Chimera.

It’s all built, but it needs some paint. I’m thinking grey!

Enough about the rant, lets get to the model. The Chimera which was for the most part, easy to build, but I had a major problem with the hatch, and it’s sticking out a good 1/2 cm from the hull. Also, the commander didn’t even have hands to operate the heavy stubber that mounted. I used the arms from a heavy weapons team sprue, which did the trick, but it looks slightly goofy. The gun looks like it is arcing a little to much, but other than that, no other complaints.

The trajectory is off at little bit.

The trajectory is off at little bit.

The stowage you on the Chimera came from an old accessory sprue from 1998. The stowage seemed like a nice touch to add, but I think adding more stowage wouldn’t be a bad idea, however, I got other things to work on at this moment.

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Stowage courtesy of 2nd Edition Warhammer 40k